Word of the Week Challenge: mortified

Suggested by a Year 5 pupil this week, our new whole school word of the week is…

mortified (adjective)

Meaning: very embarrassed or ashamed.

Example: She was mortified when her dad danced at the disco!

Can you use mortified in sentence this week? Post a comment below with an example sentence.

Mr Poyton

World Book Day 2019

Thank you to all families who helped create such fantastic World Book Day costumes. Find out more and see more photos here.

We revisited one of our favourite poems for reflection time in assembly. Can you leave a comment below to recommend a book that made you feel like the poet does…?

I Opened a Book – by Julia Donalson

I opened a book and in I strode
Now nobody can find me.
I’ve left my chair, my house, my road,
My town and my world behind me.

I’m wearing the cloak, I’ve slipped on the ring,
I’ve swallowed the magic potion.
I’ve fought with a dragon, dined with a king
And dived in a bottomless ocean.

I opened a book and made some friends.
I shared their tears and laughter
And followed their road with its bumps and bends
To the happily ever after.

I finished my book and out I came.
The cloak can no longer hide me.
My chair and my house are just the same,
But I have a book inside me.

Word of the Week Challenge: meticulous

As voted for by our Friday assembly audience, our new whole school word of the week is…

meticulous (adjective)

Meaning: showing great attention to detail; very careful and precise.

Example: The insect designs on his Book Day costume were painted on with with meticulous care.

Can you leave a comment below using meticulous in a sentence?

Mr Poyton

Word of the Week Challenge: apprehensive

Our brand new whole school word of the week, voted for by pupils, is…
apprehensive  (adjective)
Meaning: anxious or fearful that something bad or unpleasant will happen.
Example: “He felt apprehensive about walking through the woods.”
Synonyms: anxious, alarmed, worrieduneasynervousconcernedagitatedrestlessedgy, on edge, fidgetytensestressedneuroticpanicky…
Can you use apprehensive in conversation before next Friday’s assembly?  Or, even better, can you use it correctly in your writing?
Try leaving a comment below with a sentence that includes apprehensive.
Mr Poyton